It is of course true that the Shire is not representative of the majority of Middle-earth societies; it is an anomaly even in terms of the textual evolution of the Silmarillion matter. There are many realms which extend over large territories, but most still conform to one of the two alternatives […]: they are either personal “unconstitutional” (and sometimes elected) monarchies or natural associations characterized by an “an abolition of control”. It is only the evil societies - Saruman’s or Sauron’s totalitarian industrial empires with world-state ambition - that are recognizably contemporary ‘Theyocracies’, despite, or perhaps because of their basis in slavery. The orcs that Frodo and Sam encounter in Mordor use the most modern idiom in the book: theirs is distinctly the speech of twentieth-century soldiers, but also of government or party functionaries, minor officials in a murderous bureaucracy.

Anna Vaninskaya | From 'Tolkien: A Man of his Time?' in ‘Tolkien and Modernity, Volume I’ edited by Frank Weinreich and Thomas Honnegger

Left or right, the libertarian and guild socialists from Morris to Orwell, the distributists like Chesterton and Belloc, the anarchists in the mutualist line from Kropotkin, were all proponents of small, devolved, local communities. And as romantic anti-statists they were all ranged together on one side against the encroaching Servile State represented by the bureaucrats, administrators, experts and efficiency-mongers, centralists and globalists, whether of the capitalist, the Fabian, or the communist variety. It has been observed before, though never in this context, that politically the Shire is a model anarchist commune. Notwithstanding its pronounced social hierarchies and the historically-specific accoutrements of the English class system - which serve no identifiable political purpose - it is a self-governing, fully-functional community. No central government is necessary to maintain harmony, for the hobbits never fight amongst themselves. In fact, as the Prologue says regarding the “Ordering of the Shire,” hobbits “had hardly any ‘government’. Families for the most part managed their own affairs […]. Estates, farms, workshops, and small trades tended to remain unchanged for generations.” “There had been no king for nealry a thousand years,” and in the Fourth Age the Shire is guaranteed continued local autonomy from the Gondorian monarchy (Tolkien in a letter).

Anna Vaninskaya | From 'Tolkien: A Man of his Time?' in ‘Tolkien and Modernity, Volume I’ edited by Frank Weinreich and Thomas Honnegger

Government is an abstract noun meaning the art and process of governing and it should be an offence to write it with a capital G…

Tolkien in a 1943 letter to his son Christopher as quoted in 'Tolkien: A Man of his Time?' by Anna Vaninskaya.

centuriespast:

Mirror of Famous Women of Japan (Honchō Meifu Kagami)Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Japanese, 1839 - 1892. Meiji Period (1868-1912)1880 (published 1883)Color woodcut (triptych)Philadelphia Museum of Art
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centuriespast:

Mirror of Famous Women of Japan (Honchō Meifu Kagami)Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Japanese, 1839 - 1892. Meiji Period (1868-1912)1880 (published 1883)Color woodcut (triptych)Philadelphia Museum of Art
Zoom Info
centuriespast:

Mirror of Famous Women of Japan (Honchō Meifu Kagami)Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Japanese, 1839 - 1892. Meiji Period (1868-1912)1880 (published 1883)Color woodcut (triptych)Philadelphia Museum of Art
Zoom Info

centuriespast:

Mirror of Famous Women of Japan (Honchō Meifu Kagami)
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Japanese, 1839 - 1892.
Meiji Period (1868-1912)
1880 (published 1883)
Color woodcut (triptych)
Philadelphia Museum of Art

Eye of the Storm

the eye of the storm does not bode well
for those abditive in covert sorrow
satin macabre of the night before
ruined in fruitless semantics of loss


his chorography of power is a tailless cupid
marred by soulless crania of humility
nursing a wizened oriole in his pocket
interned with pustules of a fabled narrative

© Zaina Anwar | http://indigenousdialogues.tumblr.com/

And when Valinor was full-wrought and the mansions of the Valar were established, in the midst of the plain beyond the mountains they built their city, Valmar of the many bells. Before its western gate there was a green mound, Ezellohar, that is named also Corollairë; and Yavanna hallowed it, and she sat there long upon the green grass and sang a song of power, in which was set all her thought of things that grow in the earth. But Nienna thought in silence, and watered the mound with tears. In that time the Valar were gathered together to hear the song of Yavanna…

And as they watched, upon the mound there came forth two slender shoots; and silence was over all the world in that hour, nor was there any other sound save the chanting of Yavanna. Under her song the saplings grew and became fair and tall, and came to flower; and thus there awoke in the world the Two Trees of Valinor. Of all things which Yavanna made they have most renown, and about their fate all the tales of the Elder Days are woven. (Silm, 38)

Passage from The Silmarillion as quoted in 'Ents, Elves, and Eriador, The Environmental Vision of J.R.R. Tolkien' by Matthew T. Dickerson and Jonathan Evans