"Press photo [George Roger/MAGNUM photos] of Siri Ahmad Dede in the garden of the Bektashi Tekkya “Monastery” located at the Jebel Muqattam, on the outskirts of Cairo. In Turkish, the Tekkya is known as the Kaygusuz Sultan Tekkya, and in Arabic as Tekkyat Sheikh Abdallah al- Maghaweri [ Meghara= Cave in Arabic]. The order was founded by Hajji Bektash Veli from Khurasan in Eastern Persia , who settled in Eastern Anatolia in the 13th century and gained a large following in rural Turkey and later Albania. In 1826, the official patrons of the Ottoman warriors, the Janissary troops and the Bektashi Order were outlawed by Sultan Mahmud II, during his modernizing efforts. The Bektashi order’s last blow came in 1925 from Ataturk’s secular movement. Their tekkyas were closed, and the headquarters moved to Albania. Siri Ahmad Dede settled in Cairo, welcomed by the royal family of Egypt [Albanians by origin]. His tekkya was closed again, following the overthrow of King Farouk in 1952. Thereafter, Dede was to move again to the modern suburb of Maadi in Cairo, where he died a broken man.”
- Source

"Press photo [George Roger/MAGNUM photos] of Siri Ahmad Dede in the garden of the Bektashi Tekkya “Monastery” located at the Jebel Muqattam, on the outskirts of Cairo. In Turkish, the Tekkya is known as the Kaygusuz Sultan Tekkya, and in Arabic as Tekkyat Sheikh Abdallah al- Maghaweri [ Meghara= Cave in Arabic]. The order was founded by Hajji Bektash Veli from Khurasan in Eastern Persia , who settled in Eastern Anatolia in the 13th century and gained a large following in rural Turkey and later Albania. In 1826, the official patrons of the Ottoman warriors, the Janissary troops and the Bektashi Order were outlawed by Sultan Mahmud II, during his modernizing efforts. The Bektashi order’s last blow came in 1925 from Ataturk’s secular movement. Their tekkyas were closed, and the headquarters moved to Albania. Siri Ahmad Dede settled in Cairo, welcomed by the royal family of Egypt [Albanians by origin]. His tekkya was closed again, following the overthrow of King Farouk in 1952. Thereafter, Dede was to move again to the modern suburb of Maadi in Cairo, where he died a broken man.”

- Source